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26

What is my seed? Think about your seed as the combined username and password that grants access to your bank account. If anyone obtains your seed, they can login and access your funds. Seed: You must generate a random 81 character seed using only A-Z and the number 9. It is imperative that your seed be an 81 character random assortment of A-Z and 9. Use ...


18

No, a node cannot steal your seed When you send a transaction to the node you are connected to, you don't send the seed to it. The tx (=transaction) gets created locally on your PC/Smartphone/other device and it also gets digitally signed with the seed*. So it doesn't matter if you trust the node you are connected to or not. The only thing that could happen ...


17

The Private/Public key pair (aka asymetric cryptography) refers to a common cryptographic mechanism. Private and public keys are bounds together and also bound to a particular well known cryptographic algorithm like 'RSA', 'SHA', ... Private and public key aren't just random string, in fact they have the following very interesting property : If you ...


13

You want to have 27 unique symbols due to ternary computing. The Latin alphabet only provides 26. Some numbers like 0 or 1 might look like letters (O or L). Besides that they could have picked any other symbol that doesn't give confusion with letters. Arabic numerals are available in every input schema so a number makes sense. Which one isn't that important....


13

IOTA uses 81-tryte (243-trit) addresses. We assume that 81-tryte seeds (shorter seeds can be considered as 81-tryte seeds after being padded with "9") map to 81-tryte addresses uniformly and hence longer seeds would give several seeds mapping to the same address (because of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigeonhole_principle). To "hack" an address one needs ...


13

For digital storage, I would recommend using an offline password manager such as Keepass which can encrypt your key behind a password. For paper storage, it may be good to print out a copy of your seed in a QR code or otherwise stored and printed out and kept in a safe or safety deposit box. For hardware storage, hopefully options arrive soon such as ...


12

Never send your seed over the network, just explain to your friend how to generate it's own seed securely offline. Ask him one address and transfer the iotas. Securing transfer is one of the main purpose of the iota network. It would be a very bad signal (from an educational perspective) to send him a seed over the internet (or even by any other way).


12

You should never send iota to an address that was already spent. This will make it possible for an attacker to steal your iotas. This rule is uninfluenced by any snapshot. The problem after a snapshot is, that every node deletes the transaction history, only the balances are saved. Usually your wallet doesn't show any spent addresses anymore (thus ...


11

First of all, there seems to be a misconception in your question. If you spend 2 iotas from an address with 10 iotas, that address will not then contain 8 iotas, the address will actually be empty and will be 'struck out' in your wallet history. The 8 iotas are instead sent to a new 'change address'. This is why users do not have to worry about address reuse ...


10

First, a subseed is derived from the seed Treat the seed as a (little-endian) number and add the index to it (a seed starting FEDCBA... and an index of 1 therefore results in GEDCBA.... Hash the result of the previous step with Kerl (keccak) Then, a private key is derived from the subseed. The private key consists of multiple blocks (number depends on ...


9

Dice may not be best. IOTA Seeds are made up of A-Z and the number 9, and are 81 characters long. So you need a 27 sided dice, or need to do a LOT of dice rolls. Once you come up with a seed, download the light wallet from github: https://github.com/iotaledger/wallet/releases Then, input the seed you came up with there. Then, you can create addresses.


8

It's safe to keep your seed. Even if you double-spend or reuse your address, your seed doesn't get exposed, only the private key of one address of your seed is partially revealed. You can generate an infinite amount of addresses with one seed. What's the difference between a private key and a seed? What is the difference between "double-spending&...


7

What works best for me is storing the seed encrypted in a KeePass database file (or the offline password manager of your choice) on my computer and on an USB-Stick in another place (backup in case of fire, theft, ...). Hardware Wallets Having IOTAs on a Ledger Nano or Trezor would be great and they (Ledger or Trezor or both) will add IOTA eventually. ...


7

Your IOTA are not stored on your phone, they are stored on the decentralized tangle. Your seed is your password to access your IOTA, anytime, anywhere. As long as you have your seed saved in a place other than your phone, which you definitely should, then you will be totally fine. See: How can I set up a cold storage?


7

Every new address is generated by incrementing a seed and doing some hashing. This gives a useful feature: If you don't want to see the whole history of the transfers then increment the seed before entering it into wallet software and transactions associated with the very first address won't be shown (this process can be repeated). The feature may work ...


7

The balance is not stored on the seed but on the addresses created from your seed. So if you want to see your balance, you just need to know the addresses. You can either look your balance up in your own full node or, if you don't have one you can use an online Tangle explorer like thetangle.org or iotasear.ch.


6

IOTA's development team has explicitly recommended only two seed generation methods. They are: /dev/urandom (available on Linux/MaxOS) Keepass' password generator The first option may be too outlandish for most. If you prefer a point-and-click solution, you'll want to go with Keepass -- a popular & trusted password manager with a vetted generation ...


6

Depending on how thorough the malware is, following could work: don't save the last/first/middle part of your seed in your pw (=password) manager, memorize it and just manually put it in save the encrypted seed in your pw manager and recode the lightwallet so that it decrypts the seed !!! Although the above solutions could work, "well programmed" malware ...


6

The checksum of an IOTA address or seed is formed by hashing that value and then using 9 trytes (or 3 in the case of the wallet seed) of the hashed value. Meanwhile, generating an address from a seed requires several hundreds of hashes. Insofar as you are trying to discover a particular seed via brute force, knowing the checksum will allow you to discard ...


6

The Seed is your only local stored authentification and is never revealed in a transaction. Private Key's are generated with your seed in combination with a key index and are needed to sign the transaction. Random 50% of the private key are leaked when signing a transaction. That's why u should never reuse an Adress. In the most cases Private key is used as ...


6

The probability of finding a special seed is 27^81 = 8.71 * 10^115. If we assume that there are 1 trillion seeds, the probability of finding a seed with a balance is 8.71 * 10^103 . If we assume now a Computer can scan 1 Billion Seeds per second, it would take him 2.7647654 * 10^87 Years, to find one seed with a balance. This is a pretty long time, I ...


6

A VPN don't protect you about a keylogger. I don't see a useful case to use a vpn to protect your seed. If you fear keylogger, Virtualbox or any other Virtualmachine Software can help you. Also a combination of Copy/Paste and writing can prevent a keylogger to get your full seed. Feel free to read somethings about VPN here.


5

RNG would work but we don't use it because we would have to store all of the private keys. It's just more convenient to have only one seed from which you generate all the private keys. Furthermore, all current APIs use seeds and you can't even sign a transaction without the seed unless you are doing it manually (The API functions are specified to take a ...


5

No, if you have no access to the seed, it is impossible to obtain the funds. That is why doing what you did (sending test amounts) is a good habit.


5

Use Keepass, and activate two channel obfuscation, then change "Override the defaut sequence" to {PASSWORD} only. Then use CRTL + V to use the auto-type function of Keepass. This will make it harder for Keyloggers to guess where which characters was pasted. A hardware wallet that signs transactions offline would be even better, I'm sure it will come sooner ...


5

It has been observed that the more addresses in your wallet, the longer it takes for your computer to retrieve all associated addresses from the Tangle. The new wallet should remedy this -- it will be stateful, and store your previous addresses locally, so you don't have to re-retrieve them every single time you log in.


5

An address is generated from 3 inputs : a seed a security level: 1, 2 or 3 an index : an integer In theory an integer can be infinite, in computer science things are often finite. In java integer range is from -2,147,483,648 to +2,147,483,647. If you consider the java language to generate the addresses you will have 3 × 2 × 2,147,483,648 potential ...


5

No you don't ever need a new seed when you follow the present best practices. The only reason to need a new seed is if you lose your old one or if your seed gets compromised—as in someone else knows it. The seed does not get compromised through address reuse. Only the private keys can get compromised. They are derived from the seed. More in this answer. ...


4

Download the Iota Wallet for Desktop from -> https://github.com/iotaledger/wallet/releases Get the "IOTA.Wallet.Setup.2.5.4.exe" (or newer) After you install it this is what you see. In the "SEED" field enter your generated seed and click login. Yo are done. Careful: In order to see if you didn't make a typo on your seed note the last three characters (...


4

I would suggest the good old "Random Hat" Your SEED must be generated using only uppercase A to Z and the number 9 Process: 1.Take a piece of paper write the alphabet and number 9 like this: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVXYZ9 2.Cut each character with a scissor. Take a hat and put all character folded in there. 3.Mix them up and extract one piece of paper. ...


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