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1) Can I say that is more difficult to infer the source of a wallet owner since address will not be reused after an withdrawal?

2) Is it right to say that is it improbable to attack an address to get to the wallet seed using currently known computational power ?

Thank you.

  • You should probably read this : iota.stackexchange.com/questions/584/… – ben75 Dec 27 '17 at 1:18
  • Thanks. I would think it will be more difficult to walk back the tangle to look for the owner of the wallet. Since unspent amount will be deposited into a new address. For example a address with 10 IOTA and 5 goes to one address and another 5 goes to another address. It would be not possible to infer that the two address belong to a single wallet or two wallets. I hope I am right on this one. Comment please. Thank you. – AlbertK Dec 27 '17 at 1:44
  • Ok. I understood your point. Indeed, there is no way to guess that 2 addresses were generated from the same seed – ben75 Dec 27 '17 at 1:51
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1) Can I say that is more difficult to infer the source of a wallet owner since address will not be reused after an withdrawal?

Although no one cannot infer the "seed" from addresses, it is still possible to track paths of the transactions. Unless the transaction goes to an exchange address or you use IOTA mixer (see links below), you cannot have a complete anonymity on your transactions.

https://medium.com/iota-ucl/iota-mixer-91f3d39735c1

https://blog.iota.org/research-on-private-transactions-in-iota-cd546751e2c4

2) Is it right to say that is it improbable to attack an address to get to the wallet seed using currently known computational power ?

It is indeed improbable to crack a seed from an address. A seed plus an index (plus a security level) generates a private key. A private key generates an address.

seed + index:0 --> private key:0 --> address:DJAKSDAMSDJA seed + index:1 --> private key:1 --> address:QPLMGOZYRAPQ

Although forging a private key is possible with available computational power when an user signs for multiple transactions with a private key, in other words, spending more than once from the same address, attacks cannot infer the seed from the private key. The "oneway-ness" of the hashing algorithm makes it impossible to crack an IOTA seed from its private key.

  • In a sense given two or more addresses generated from a seed, is it possible statistically possible to infer that it comes from a particular wallet (seed) ?. – AlbertK Dec 27 '17 at 5:04

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