8

I would like to know more about the JINN project.

  • What is JINN?
  • Why is it important to Iota?
  • Where can I get more information about JINN?
8

Here is the JINN website: http://iotanodes.org/jinn/

Nobody knows much about Jinn project except its global scope. The idea is to develop a low energy ternary processor. Everything else remains secret.

It's important for IOTA because IOTA uses ternary to compute hashes and so all computation to sign transactions involves ternary operations, which are not optimal on binary processors.

It's important because a "low-energy-processor" is particularly adapted to IOT devices.

  • Thanks for the answer. I am an amateur student of cryptography, but I am involved with microelectronics and nanotechnology. Hardware is something that interests me a lot. +1 – Avelino Dec 2 '17 at 21:57
5

JINN is currently under NDA and doesn't release any information about its development.

Here are some snippets of what we know about JINN via the developers on Slack:

  • JINN is a low cost (target price: $1) ternary processor which is designed to have a small footprint to be put into any sort of device, including very low power, cheap, and small IoT devices in order to manage the PoW of IOTA and other unrevealed tasks

  • Iota was designed after JINN was conceptualized and no other blockchain coins were able to suit the requirements for its usage

  • The entire IOTA team works closely with whoever is developing JINN, with likely overlap between the two teams

  • David has referred to "fog" and "mist" as a next generation version of the cloud, potentially referring to using JINN as the foundation for a future layer upon the internet of decentralized processing

More information about JINN will be released with time. For now, there is almost no public information.

  • Thanks for the answer. I am an amateur student of cryptography, but I am involved with microelectronics and nanotechnology. Hardware is something that interests me a lot. +1 – Avelino Dec 2 '17 at 21:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.