6

What was the motivation behind making a tryte equal to three trits? Seems counter-intuitive that a byte contains more combinations than a tryte—at least from a semantical perspective.

  • Not sure this is an IOTA question. IOTA didn't "invent" trytes. It might be more appropriate on the Computer Science or even English Stack Exchange. – Helmar Mar 1 '18 at 14:17
  • 2
    I think that the tryte term was always used as a undefined collection of trits and only in IOTA context a tryte is a collection of 3 trits. – Roberto Giorgetti Mar 1 '18 at 16:12
  • 1
    @Helmar Yes, but didn't IOTA define a tryte as three trits for this project? I don't see this definition mentioned anywhere else. – shoe Mar 1 '18 at 19:20
  • 2
    Others use e.g. 6 trits (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ternary_numeral_system#Tryte), but also in the past, computers had 6 or 9 bits in a byte (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte). So I think this is a valid question for this StackExchange why IOTA chose 3 (but probably there is no good answer there, let's see :D) – mihi Mar 1 '18 at 20:37
3

Trits are not very readable by humans, so English letters and a separator ('9') were used for combinations of 3 trits. Calling them "characters" would require to add "used in IOTA addresses" sometimes which is not convenient. Long story short, I decided to call them "trytes", that term wasn't used anywhere else anyway.

Regarding a byte being able to store more data, conventional computers operate with computer words, not bytes. Bytes don't longer matter much.

  • Right, I meant that "tryte" hadn't been used in IOTA and Jinn (a trinary processor). – Come-from-Beyond May 13 '18 at 19:46
0

I didn't find any IOTA specific source to explain the choice to use trytes made of three trits.

Probably 27 being the number of all possible different combinations of 3 trits, (3^3), then 3 trits is the best choice if you want to use the letters in English alphabet (26), plus an additional character (9), to represent numbers in this notation.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.